Patient Education

The Eye Clinic of Meridian has been providing state-of-the-art eye care for east central Mississippi and west central Alabama for the past 30 years. The following links provide additional information for some of the general services we offer. If you have any questions, or would like further information, feel free to contact us. We would be happy to answer any questions you may have.

Astigmatism

Astigmatism is an eye condition that affects a high percentage of the population. It results from an imperfect curvature of eye that causes refractive error. This means that, when light enters the eye, it is not focused evenly onto the retina. Instead, it is focused either in front of or behind the retina, often resulting in blurred vision. ...


Read More...
 

Blepharoplasty

Blepharoplasty (eyelid surgery) is a plastic surgery procedure for correcting sagging or drooping eyelids. The eyelid, because its skin is much thinner than that in other parts of the face, is often one of the first facial areas to exhibit signs of aging. Eyelids that sag or droop can affect peripheral vision, making daily activities such as driving more difficult. Blepharoplasty may become necessary when various factors, which include aging, sun damage, smoking and obesity, cause the muscles and tissue that support the eyelids to weaken. ...


Read More...
 

Cataract Surgery

A cataract is a clouding of the lens of the eye; cataract surgery is performed to improve vision by replacing the clouded lens with an artificial one. Cataracts affect millions of people in the United States each year. Most cataracts are the result of aging, though some form as a result of genetic factors, disease or injury. Cataract surgery is common, and considered safe and effective. ...


Read More...
 

Cataracts

Each year, cataracts affect millions of people, including more than half of all Americans aged 60 and older. A cataract is a painless clouding of the eye's natural lens that is caused by a buildup of protein. A cataract can form in one or both eyes. If left untreated, cataracts worsen over time and interfere with everyday activities such as reading or driving. Night vision is usually most affected. When cataracts are in their early stages, people are helped by brighter lighting. As cataracts get worse, however, most people require surgery. ...


Read More...
 

Comprehensive Eye Examination

Regular eye examinations are important in maintaining eye health. During a comprehensive eye examination, eye diseases or other abnormalities that are not yet causing symptoms can be detected. Early intervention is crucial in preventing vision loss from a disease such as glaucoma, which may not cause symptoms until significant and irreversible damage has taken place. Early detection of eye problems gives a patient a choice of treatment options, and reduces the risk of permanent damage. ...


Read More...
 

Contact Lenses

A contact lens is a thin, convex disc that floats on the surface of the eye, providing vision correction. With advances in optical technology, most people can use contact lenses, regardless of the type or extent of their vision problems. This includes patients with astigmatism, and those who need bifocal or multifocal lenses. In some cases, however, contact lenses are contraindicated. ...


Read More...
 

Corneal Ulcer

A corneal ulcer, also known as an eyesore or ulcerative keratitis, is a sore that forms on the surface of the cornea, the clear portion of the eye. It is typically the result of a bacterial, viral or fungal infection. Other possible causes include the following:

  • Corneal abrasion
  • Dry-eye disorder
  • Medical conditions resulting in inflammation

Corneal ulcers are more common in those who wear contact lenses, particularly when the lenses are not removed at night or cleaned properly. ...


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Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes that affects the eyes. The length of time a person has diabetes determines his or her likelihood of developing diabetic retinopathy. It is the most common diabetic eye complication, and a leading cause of blindness in American adults. Diabetic retinopathy causes the blood vessels that supply nourishment to the retina, the light-sensitive lining in the back of the eye where vision is focused, to weaken, swell and leak, causing a loss of vision. ...


Read More...
 

Dry Eye

Dry eye is a common condition in which the eyes are insufficiently lubricated, leading to itching, redness and pain. The eyes can become dry and irritated because the tear ducts are not producing a sufficient number of tears, or because there is a chemical imbalance in the tears themselves. Natural tears require a particular chemical balance to lubricate the eyes efficiently. ...


Read More...
 

Ectropion

Ectropion is an eye condition in which the eyelid turns outward. It typically affects the lower eyelid, exposing the inner lid in either one section of eye or across the entire lid. Ectropion prevents tears from draining from the eye correctly, resulting in irritation. It usually occurs in older adults as a result of the aging process, during which muscles, tendons and connective tissue around the eyes progressively weaken. Those who have had trauma to the face or eyes are at greater risk of developing ectropion. ...


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Flashes and Floaters

Flashes and floaters of the eye are usually the result of age-related changes to the vitreous, which is the thick gel firmly attached to the retina from birth. During the aging process, however, the vitreous becomes thinner and more watery, and at some point pulls away from the retina. This is known as a posterior vitreous separation or detachment (PVD). During PVD, tissue debris that was once secure in the firm vitreous gel loosens and moves around, casting shadows on the retina. ...


Read More...
 

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a group of related diseases that damage the optic nerve, resulting in vision loss and possible blindness. Many people affected with glaucoma do not experience symptoms, and may not be aware that they have the disease until they have lost a significant amount of vision. With early detection and treatment, however, eyes can be protected against the serious loss of vision or blindness. Catching glaucoma at an early, treatable stage is one important reason to have regular, thorough eye examinations. A leading cause of blindness and visual impairment in the United States, glaucoma affects patients of all ages. ...


Read More...
 

Hyperopia

Hyperopia (farsightedness) is a condition of the eyes in which distant objects are in clearer focus than objects closer to the eye, which appear blurry. The eye is designed to focus images directly on the surface of the retina; with hyperopia, light rays focus behind the surface of the retina, producing a blurred image. Hyperopia, which is often inherited, occurs if the eyeball is abnormally short, the cornea has too little curvature, or the lens is situated too far back in the eye. ...


Read More...
 

Intraocular Lenses

An intraocular lens (IOL) is an artificial replacement lens implanted when a patient's natural lens has been surgically removed during cataract surgery. A wide variety of replacement lenses is available to cataract patients. Each type of lens has its own advantage for post-surgery vision, The most effective lens to use depends on the patient's preferences and particular vision goals, which can differ according to individual occupations and lifestyles. IOLs often eliminate the need for glasses or contacts after cataract surgery, conveniently providing most patients with clear vision. ...


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LASIK

LASIK, an acronym for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis, is a refractive procedure that reshapes the cornea to correct nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism. It is the most common type of refractive surgery. Using targeted laser-beam energy, the LASIK procedure reshapes the cornea so that light rays are focused more precisely on the retina, producing clear, sharp vision. ...


Read More...
 

Macular Degeneration

Macular degeneration, also known as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), is a common condition in older adults, and the leading cause of vision loss in people aged 50 and older. Macular degeneration affects the macula, the part of the retina responsible for the crisp, detailed central vision needed for reading or driving.

Types of Macular Degeneration

Macular degeneration can be classified as either dry (non-neovascular) or wet (neovascular). Dry macular degeneration is the more common diagnosis, and is considered to be an early stage of the disease. This form of the disorder usually develops as the macular tissues thin during aging. Deposits of pigment within the macula may also occur. ...


Read More...
 

Myopia

Myopia, also known as nearsightedness or shortsightedness, is a condition of the eyes in which nearby objects can be seen clearly, and but distant objects cannot. Almost a third of people in the United States experience some degree of nearsightedness.

Causes of Myopia

The curve of the cornea, the clear covering of the eye, refracts (bends) light, directing it to the retina, the back surface of the eye. When the corneal curvature is abnormal, or the shape of the eye is abnormally oblong, rather than round, it is more difficult for the eyes to focus light directly onto the retina. Instead, the focus is in front of the retina. This results in blurred vision. ...


Read More...
 

On-Site Optical Shop

In addition to providing comprehensive ophthalmology services, an optical center, featuring a wide array of eyeglass frames and contact lenses to suit every budget, is located on site. Patients can choose frames from many elite designers, as well as stylish yet affordable alternatives. In addition, there is a full line of frames for children and teens, and a great selection of athletic eyewear. The convenient on-site location eliminates the hassle of having to take a prescription to another location to get it filled. ...


Read More...
 

Pediatric Eye Examination

Clear vision and healthy eyes are important to a child's overall health and well-being, and are directly linked to academic performance. While vision screenings given at a child's school each year may identify children who are at risk for vision problems, vision screenings do not test the overall health of the eyes. A professional eye examination, performed by a certified ophthalmologist, assesses vision, while looking for serious conditions and diseases. ...


Read More...
 

Penetrating Keratoplasty

Penetrating keratoplasty (PKP), also referred to as a corneal transplant or corneal graft, is the surgical removal of a damaged or diseased portion of the cornea, followed by the implantation of healthy tissue from a donated human cornea, which is usually obtained from an eye bank. The cornea is the clear covering of the front of the eye that refracts (bends) light rays as they enter the eye. If visual acuity is compromised because the cornea is not shaped properly or is clouded from injury, infection or disease, PKP may be recommended. The cornea has five layers; during PKP, all five layers are replaced with donor tissue. ...


Read More...
 

Photorefractive Keratectomy

Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) is a laser vision-correction procedure that reshapes the cornea to correct mild-to-moderate conditions of myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness) and astigmatism. It is the second-most-common type of laser eye surgery after LASIK. During LASIK, a flap is created to access the cornea; during PRK the entire epithelial layer of the cornea is removed and later allowed to grow back. During both processes, the cornea is reshaped to provide vision correction. ...


Read More...
 

Presbyopia

Presbyopia, a condition in which the eyes gradually lose the ability to focus at a close range, is a normal part of the aging process. It occurs when the lens of the eye loses its flexibility, causing nearby objects to appear blurry. Symptoms take years to develop; most patients begin to show signs in their early-to-mid 40s. Typically, the condition worsens until about age 65. Presbyopia is diagnosed with a routine eye examination, and is treated with corrective lenses or surgery. ...


Read More...
 

Ptosis

Ptosis is the drooping of the upper eyelid. Although ptosis is usually the result of aging, it sometimes develops after eye surgery or injury. Sometimes the condition is congenital. Because ptosis may be present due to serious causes, patients with this disorder should be checked by a medical professional to determine whether treatment is necessary and, if so, what kind. ...


Read More...
 

Refractive Lens Exchange

Refractive lens exchange (RLE), also known as clear lens extraction (CLE), is a surgical procedure for vision correction that replaces the natural lens of the eye with an artificial intraocular lens (IOL). Using the same surgical techniques as cataract surgery, RLE is an alternative to laser vision correction, which modifies the cornea. ...


Read More...
 

Retinal Tear

The retina is a light-sensitive layer of tissue that lines the inner surface of the eye. It is attached to the vitreous, the gel-like substance that gives the eye most of its volume. As a result of the aging process, the vitreous thins and its shape changes, sometimes causing it to pull away from the retina. This separation, known as posterior vitreous detachment (PVD), is a normal part of aging, but it can result in a retinal tear. Without treatment, retinal tears can cause retinal detachment that may result in blindness, so it is important for adults older than 50 to be vigilant about getting regular eye examinations. ...


Read More...


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Astigmatism

Astigmatism is an eye condition that affects a high percentage of the population. It results from an imperfect curvature of eye that causes refractive error. This means that, when light enters the eye, it is not focused evenly onto the retina. Instead, it is focused either in front of or behind the retina, often resulting in blurred vision. ...


Read More...

Cataract Surgery

A cataract is a clouding of the lens of the eye; cataract surgery is performed to improve vision by replacing the clouded lens with an artificial one. Cataracts affect millions of people in the United States each year. Most cataracts are the result of aging, though some form as a result of genetic factors, disease or injury. Cataract surgery is common, and considered safe and effective. ...


Read More...

Blepharoplasty

Blepharoplasty (eyelid surgery) is a plastic surgery procedure for correcting sagging or drooping eyelids. The eyelid, because its skin is much thinner than that in other parts of the face, is often one of the first facial areas to exhibit signs of aging. Eyelids that sag or droop can affect peripheral vision, making daily activities such as driving more difficult. Blepharoplasty may become necessary when various factors, which include aging, sun damage, smoking and obesity, cause the muscles and tissue that support the eyelids to weaken. ...


Read More...

Intraocular Lenses

An intraocular lens (IOL) is an artificial replacement lens implanted when a patient's natural lens has been surgically removed during cataract surgery. At the Eye Clinic of Meridian we offer several options to determine the best fit for your lifestyle.

Monofocal Intraocular Lens

A monofocal lens is an intraocular lens that has a fixed focus at distance to provide enhanced distance vision. This lens does not correct astigmatism, intermediate, or near vision so glasses are often required after surgery. ...


Read More...

Comprehensive Eye Examination

Regular eye examinations are important in maintaining eye health. During a comprehensive eye examination, eye diseases or other abnormalities that are not yet causing symptoms can be detected. Early intervention is crucial in preventing vision loss from a disease such as glaucoma, which may not cause symptoms until significant and irreversible damage has taken place. Early detection of eye problems gives a patient a choice of treatment options, and reduces the risk of permanent damage. ...


Read More...

Contact Lenses

A contact lens is a thin, convex disc that floats on the surface of the eye, providing vision correction. With advances in optical technology, most people can use contact lenses, regardless of the type or extent of their vision problems. This includes patients with astigmatism, and those who need bifocal or multifocal lenses. In some cases, however, contact lenses are contraindicated. ...


Read More...

LASIK

LASIK, an acronym for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis, is a refractive procedure that reshapes the cornea to correct nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism. It is the most common type of refractive surgery. Using targeted laser-beam energy, the LASIK procedure reshapes the cornea so that light rays are focused more precisely on the retina, producing clear, sharp vision. ...


Read More...

Cataracts

Each year, cataracts affect millions of people, including more than half of all Americans aged 60 and older. A cataract is a painless clouding of the eye's natural lens that is caused by a buildup of protein. A cataract can form in one or both eyes. If left untreated, cataracts worsen over time and interfere with everyday activities such as reading or driving. Night vision is usually most affected. When cataracts are in their early stages, people are helped by brighter lighting. As cataracts get worse, however, most people require surgery. ...


Read More...

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes that affects the eyes. The length of time a person has diabetes determines his or her likelihood of developing diabetic retinopathy. It is the most common diabetic eye complication, and a leading cause of blindness in American adults. Diabetic retinopathy causes the blood vessels that supply nourishment to the retina, the light-sensitive lining in the back of the eye where vision is focused, to weaken, swell and leak, causing a loss of vision. ...


Read More...

Dry Eye

Dry eye is a common condition in which the eyes are insufficiently lubricated, leading to itching, redness and pain. The eyes can become dry and irritated because the tear ducts are not producing a sufficient number of tears, or because there is a chemical imbalance in the tears themselves. Natural tears require a particular chemical balance to lubricate the eyes efficiently. ...


Read More...

Flashes and Floaters

Flashes and floaters of the eye are usually the result of age-related changes to the vitreous, which is the thick gel firmly attached to the retina from birth. During the aging process, however, the vitreous becomes thinner and more watery, and at some point pulls away from the retina. This is known as a posterior vitreous separation or detachment (PVD). During PVD, tissue debris that was once secure in the firm vitreous gel loosens and moves around, casting shadows on the retina. ...


Read More...

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a group of related diseases that damage the optic nerve, resulting in vision loss and possible blindness. Many people affected with glaucoma do not experience symptoms, and may not be aware that they have the disease until they have lost a significant amount of vision. With early detection and treatment, however, eyes can be protected against the serious loss of vision or blindness. Catching glaucoma at an early, treatable stage is one important reason to have regular, thorough eye examinations. A leading cause of blindness and visual impairment in the United States, glaucoma affects patients of all ages. ...


Read More...

Hyperopia

Hyperopia (farsightedness) is a condition of the eyes in which distant objects are in clearer focus than objects closer to the eye, which appear blurry. The eye is designed to focus images directly on the surface of the retina; with hyperopia, light rays focus behind the surface of the retina, producing a blurred image. Hyperopia, which is often inherited, occurs if the eyeball is abnormally short, the cornea has too little curvature, or the lens is situated too far back in the eye. ...


Read More...

Macular Degeneration

Macular degeneration, also known as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), is a common condition in older adults, and the leading cause of vision loss in people aged 50 and older. Macular degeneration affects the macula, the part of the retina responsible for the crisp, detailed central vision needed for reading or driving.

Types of Macular Degeneration

Macular degeneration can be classified as either dry (non-neovascular) or wet (neovascular). Dry macular degeneration is the more common diagnosis, and is considered to be an early stage of the disease. This form of the disorder usually develops as the macular tissues thin during aging. Deposits of pigment within the macula may also occur. ...


Read More...

Myopia

Myopia, also known as nearsightedness or shortsightedness, is a condition of the eyes in which nearby objects can be seen clearly, and but distant objects cannot. Almost a third of people in the United States experience some degree of nearsightedness.

Causes of Myopia

The curve of the cornea, the clear covering of the eye, refracts (bends) light, directing it to the retina, the back surface of the eye. When the corneal curvature is abnormal, or the shape of the eye is abnormally oblong, rather than round, it is more difficult for the eyes to focus light directly onto the retina. Instead, the focus is in front of the retina. This results in blurred vision. ...


Read More...

On-Site Optical Shop

In addition to providing comprehensive ophthalmology services, an optical center, featuring a wide array of eyeglass frames and contact lenses to suit every budget, is located on site. Patients can choose frames from many elite designers, as well as stylish yet affordable alternatives. In addition, there is a full line of frames for children and teens, and a great selection of athletic eyewear. The convenient on-site location eliminates the hassle of having to take a prescription to another location to get it filled. ...


Read More...

Pediatric Eye Examination

Clear vision and healthy eyes are important to a child's overall health and well-being, and are directly linked to academic performance. While vision screenings given at a child's school each year may identify children who are at risk for vision problems, vision screenings do not test the overall health of the eyes. A professional eye examination, performed by a certified ophthalmologist, assesses vision, while looking for serious conditions and diseases. ...


Read More...

Penetrating Keratoplasty

Penetrating keratoplasty (PKP), also referred to as a corneal transplant or corneal graft, is the surgical removal of a damaged or diseased portion of the cornea, followed by the implantation of healthy tissue from a donated human cornea, which is usually obtained from an eye bank. The cornea is the clear covering of the front of the eye that refracts (bends) light rays as they enter the eye. If visual acuity is compromised because the cornea is not shaped properly or is clouded from injury, infection or disease, PKP may be recommended. The cornea has five layers; during PKP, all five layers are replaced with donor tissue. ...


Read More...

Photorefractive Keratectomy

Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) is a laser vision-correction procedure that reshapes the cornea to correct mild-to-moderate conditions of myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness) and astigmatism. It is the second-most-common type of laser eye surgery after LASIK. During LASIK, a flap is created to access the cornea; during PRK the entire epithelial layer of the cornea is removed and later allowed to grow back. During both processes, the cornea is reshaped to provide vision correction. ...


Read More...

Presbyopia

Presbyopia, a condition in which the eyes gradually lose the ability to focus at a close range, is a normal part of the aging process. It occurs when the lens of the eye loses its flexibility, causing nearby objects to appear blurry. Symptoms take years to develop; most patients begin to show signs in their early-to-mid 40s. Typically, the condition worsens until about age 65. Presbyopia is diagnosed with a routine eye examination, and is treated with corrective lenses or surgery. ...


Read More...

Ptosis

Ptosis is the drooping of the upper eyelid. Although ptosis is usually the result of aging, it sometimes develops after eye surgery or injury. Sometimes the condition is congenital. Because ptosis may be present due to serious causes, patients with this disorder should be checked by a medical professional to determine whether treatment is necessary and, if so, what kind. ...


Read More...

Refractive Lens Exchange

Refractive lens exchange (RLE), also known as clear lens extraction (CLE), is a surgical procedure for vision correction that replaces the natural lens of the eye with an artificial intraocular lens (IOL). Using the same surgical techniques as cataract surgery, RLE is an alternative to laser vision correction, which modifies the cornea. ...


Read More...

Retinal Tear

The retina is a light-sensitive layer of tissue that lines the inner surface of the eye. It is attached to the vitreous, the gel-like substance that gives the eye most of its volume. As a result of the aging process, the vitreous thins and its shape changes, sometimes causing it to pull away from the retina. This separation, known as posterior vitreous detachment (PVD), is a normal part of aging, but it can result in a retinal tear. Without treatment, retinal tears can cause retinal detachment that may result in blindness, so it is important for adults older than 50 to be vigilant about getting regular eye examinations. ...


Read More...